The Minor Accomplishments of Carlos E Gutierrez

Apr 15

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utcjonesobservatory:

Mars: Osuga Valles
The central portion of Osuga Valles, which has a total length of 164 km. In some places, it is 20 km wide and plunges to a depth of 900 m. It is located approximately 170 km south of Eos Chaos, which is located at the periphery in the far eastern portion of the vast Valles Marineris canyon system. Catastrophic flooding is thought to have created the heavily eroded Osuga Valles, which displays streamlined islands and a grooved floor carved by fast-flowing water. The water flowed in a northeasterly direction (towards the bottom right in this image) and eventually drained into another region of chaotic terrain, just seen at the bottom of the image. Several large impact craters are also seen in this scene, including the ghostly outline of an ancient, partially buried crater in the bottom centre of the image.  The image was created using data acquired with the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Mars Express on 7 December 2013 during orbit 12 624. The image resolution is about 17 m per pixel and the image centre is at about 15ºS / 322ºE. Caption: ESA ESA/DLR/FU Berlin

utcjonesobservatory:

Mars: Osuga Valles

The central portion of Osuga Valles, which has a total length of 164 km. In some places, it is 20 km wide and plunges to a depth of 900 m. It is located approximately 170 km south of Eos Chaos, which is located at the periphery in the far eastern portion of the vast Valles Marineris canyon system. Catastrophic flooding is thought to have created the heavily eroded Osuga Valles, which displays streamlined islands and a grooved floor carved by fast-flowing water. The water flowed in a northeasterly direction (towards the bottom right in this image) and eventually drained into another region of chaotic terrain, just seen at the bottom of the image. Several large impact craters are also seen in this scene, including the ghostly outline of an ancient, partially buried crater in the bottom centre of the image.  The image was created using data acquired with the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Mars Express on 7 December 2013 during orbit 12 624. The image resolution is about 17 m per pixel and the image centre is at about 15ºS / 322ºE. Caption: ESA ESA/DLR/FU Berlin

oregonianphoto:

HILLSBORO, OREGON - April 13, 2014 - Danza Azteca Ameyaltonal performed traditional dance and ceremony. Their name means spring water and the warmth of the sun, or what gives life, in the Mexican native language of Nahuatl. The 10th Annual Latino Cultural Festival was held Sunday in Hillsboro at the Tom Hughes Civic Center Plaza. It included a Futsal tournament, traditional and modern dance performances and food. A walking parade kicked off the festivities, which were meant to engage the Latino community while also celebrating it. Stephanie Yao Long/The Oregonian

oregonianphoto:

HILLSBORO, OREGON - April 13, 2014 - Danza Azteca Ameyaltonal performed traditional dance and ceremony. Their name means spring water and the warmth of the sun, or what gives life, in the Mexican native language of Nahuatl. The 10th Annual Latino Cultural Festival was held Sunday in Hillsboro at the Tom Hughes Civic Center Plaza. It included a Futsal tournament, traditional and modern dance performances and food. A walking parade kicked off the festivities, which were meant to engage the Latino community while also celebrating it. Stephanie Yao Long/The Oregonian

[video]

(Source: utsunderthesky, via reallyadog)

Apr 12

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Los Angeles from the Sky
Photography by George Medvedev (Vancouver, Canada); Los Angeles, California

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Los Angeles from the Sky

Photography by George Medvedev (Vancouver, Canada); Los Angeles, California

Apr 11

(Source: primpxproper, via papermagazine)

theatlantic:

The Slaughter Bench of History

How war created civilization over the past 10,000 years—and threatens to destroy it in the next 40.
 Read more.[Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

The Slaughter Bench of History

How war created civilization over the past 10,000 years—and threatens to destroy it in the next 40.

 Read more.[Image: Wikimedia Commons]

(Source: notesondesign, via nprfreshair)

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